Churchill and Sea Power is the first major study of Winston Churchill's record as a naval strategist and his impact as the most prominent guardian of Britain's sea power in the modern era.

Based on extensive archival research, the book debunks many popular and well-entrenched myths surrounding controversial episodes in both World Wars, including the Dardanelles disaster, the failed Norwegian Campaign, the Battle of the Atlantic, and the devastating loss of the Prince of Wales and Repulse in 1941.

It shows that many common criticisms of Churchill have been exaggerated, but also that some of his mistakes have been largely overlooked--such as his willingness to prolong the Battle of the Atlantic in order to concentrate resources on the bombing campaign against Nazi Germany.

Recent Blog Posts

I began my previous book, Churchill and Sea Power, by explaining why I had chosen to publish a new work about Winston Churchill, surely one of the most studied historical figures of the twentieth century.

I am not happy with how Halifax Regional Municipality gives out parking tickets, and one of the advantages of having a blog is that I have a forum to vent some frustration. Hopefully my experience will help others avoid the same mistakes.

Churchill and Sea Power has provided me with one other new experience of the publishing world: being remaindered! The publishing world is moving on, and it’s time for me to do the same. I’m not done with Churchill, though.

Book reviews are pretty much always a disappointment. No matter how positive the reviewer is, it’s hard not to wish they had lavished even more praise on the book than they did.

Coming Soon to a Bookstore Near You: Churchill and the Dardanelles

WSC in 1915

I began my previous book, Churchill and Sea Power, by explaining why I had chosen to publish a new work about Winston Churchill, surely one of the most studied historical figures of the twentieth century. Four years later, I find myself in the curious position of having written another volume about Churchill, and on a topic that I had already addressed in the earlier book.

VII. Moving On

Churchill and Sea Power has provided me with one other new experience of the publishing world: being remaindered! The publishing world is moving on, and it’s time for me to do the same. I’m not done with Churchill, though. The last two years have been spent tying up many of the loose ends from Churchill and Sea Power .

VI. Reviews

Book reviews are pretty much always a disappointment. No matter how positive the reviewer is, it’s hard not to wish they had lavished even more praise on the book than they did. And even when a review is very positive, the pleasure in reading it can still be diminished when the author doesn’t seem to appreciate what the book is actually about. It’s surprising how often that happens, even in academic journals. Still, a positive-but-misinformed review is generally preferable, in my opinion, to a bad review of any kind! It’s been extremely gratifying to see that the response to Churchill and Sea Power has been very positive.

Gallipoli Centenary

One of the unexpected pleasures of the conference was acquiring a copy of a new book by Rhys Crawley, Climax at Gallipoli: The Failure of the August Offensive, published in 2014 by the University of Oklahoma Press. This is a book I might have missed in the normal course of things, but I’m glad I didn’t.

The Navy Records Society does it again

Naval Route to the Abyss cover

The Navy Records Society has been publishing high-quality collections of naval documents since 1893. I’ve just received a copy of its latest volume, The Naval Route to the Abyss , and could not help but be impressed. Or perhaps I should say, “more impressed than usual”.

Read an excerpt from 'Churchill & Sea Power'

Winston Churchill enjoyed a longer and closer relationship with the Royal Navy than any British politician of the twentieth century. In 1911, at the relatively young age of thirty-six, Churchill was appointed First Lord of the Admiralty, the political head of the British navy. He threw himself into the task of preparing the service for war, and presided over its fortunes until May 1915, when a political crisis, partly of his own making, drove him from office in disgrace

Reflections On Making and Marketing of Churchill & Sea Power

Churchill and Sea Power is a very different sort of publishing experience for me. I always thought my first two books had some commercial potential, but looking back I can see that they were destined to be typical ‘academic’ publications. They looked and felt like ‘real’ books -- which was very gratifying, to be sure -- but they were never going to reach a large audience.

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